Tag Archives: Costume History

The Techniques of Theatrical Makeup Before 1920, Costume Con 26, San Jose, 2008, Presentation by Tara Maginnis

Photo of Tara Maginnis demonstrating the application of Stage Makeup (for an elderly Drunk) using the powdered pigment technique used by many actors through the 1870s on an audience volunteer.   This type of makeup was common in Gas Lit Theatres, but was already being replaced with greasepaint when the first book on stage makeup (describing this process) was written in the 1870s.
Photo of Tara Maginnis demonstrating the application of Stage Makeup (for an elderly Drunk character) using the powdered pigment technique used by many actors through the 1870s on an audience volunteer. This type of makeup was common in Gas Lit Theatres, but was already being replaced with greasepaint when the first book on stage makeup (describing this process) was written in the 1870s.
Article reviewing the conference Presentation, pg 1
Article reviewing the conference Presentation, pg 1
Article reviewing the conference Presentation, pg 2
Article reviewing the conference Presentation, pg 2
Screen Shot of the PowerPoint slide show portion of the presentation
Screen Shot of the PowerPoint slide show portion of the presentation, and photos of two of the historical makeup kits shown during the presentation
Miniposter for the Conference Room Door
Miniposter for the Conference Room Door
Handout for Conference attendees on Theatre Makeup Before 1920, pg 1
Handout for Conference attendees on Theatre Makeup Before 1920, pg 1
Handout for Conference attendees on Theatre Makeup Before 1920, pg 2
Handout for Conference attendees on Theatre Makeup Before 1920, pg 2
Handout for Conference attendees on Theatre Makeup Before 1920, pg 3
Handout for Conference attendees on Theatre Makeup Before 1920, pg 3

Hamlet, Diablo Valley College, 2014, Costume Designs by Tara Maginnis

1524880_10202580252368751_98846026_n  As you can tell from this poster, our director, Nichole Hess-Diestler asked the designers to set this play in South Carolina, c. 1881.  We went full Southern Gothic, and most of the action took place in a country plantation/estate garden, with a decaying Gazebo on stage right, and a small family cemetery at stage left.  Just a few scenes were interiors.   Most of the cast was to wear white, beige and grey, with the exceptions of Hamlet, (and later Laertes) in black, and the players in bright colors.  My “Renderings” were in fact research collages, since most of the show was to be pulled and thrifted from bits and pieces:

Publicity & Archive Photos by Ed Trujillo:

Photos I took backstage and from the wings at a student matinee, mostly showing the two built from scratch costumes for Ophelia & Gertrude.  Ophelia’s dress can convert from day dress to evening dress with the removal of her under shirt.  Ophelia’s mad scenes happen in increasingly dirty underwear:

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Stereographs as an Educational Resource in Costume History, Theatre Design and Technology, Spring 1987

Stereographs as an Educational Resource in Costume History, Theatre Design and Technology, Spring 1987, by Tara Maginnis

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“She Saves Who Sews for Victory”: Home Sewing on the American Home Front, Costume, Volume 26, Issue 1, 1992

“She Saves Who Sews for Victory”: Home Sewing on the American Home Front, Costume, Volume 26, Issue 1, 1992, by Tara Maginnis

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