Places to buy Detachable Collars, get them laundered, etc.

Buying Collars:

Amazon Drygoods (Predates Amazon.com to which it is not related. It is a long standing historical clothing supply store, it sells new paper and cloth ready-made collars in historical styles, collar buttons and shirt fronts. The pressed paper and laminate , and can usually last through a 3-weekend run of a college play. The collars are made on the original 1860s machinery of the Reversible Collar Company, original maker of Linene collars, a paper-cloth laminate, which Amazon Drygoods purchased in the 1980s when after the R.C. Co. and it’s successor Gibson-Lee went under after over 100 years of business. So, though these are laminate, they are actually some of the most period-correct collars you can get).

Etsy Store: Fogey Unlimited (Sells vintage and new menswear including new linen collars in vintage designs).

Historical Emporium (Reenactor Clothing, lots of cool stuff.)

Etsy Store: Hidden River Finds (Vintage/antique clothing including many early 20th Century collars).

New & Lingwood (UK company that makes menswear including Eton uniforms since 1865, still makes collars).

Premiere Designs Historic Clothing (Victorian/Edwardian historical reenactor supply, including collars.

Darcy Clothing (Has historical style collars both made like original models. and in machine washable stays stiff with no starch models).

Barker Collars (UK Sells formal wear, including bespoke (aka custom-made) collars, and has a starching service.)

Luke Eyres Specializes in making parts for all those old and fun traditional British uniforms for sports (cricket of course) and professions (clerical, legal, military) that still use styles worked out 100+ years ago. As a result, they sell styles of collar that are not available in the usual Victorian/Edwardian reenactor sites in the US. So if you need legal or clerical bands or 19th Century style military collars etc, they have the lot.

USHist.com (Sells new made Victorian collar styles to reenactors).

Vintage Dancer page on “Where to buy detachable collars”, that lists even more places.

Laundering Collars:

Wizner Dry Cleaning NYC Dry Cleaner – Dry Cleaning Specialists in Fine Garments, Rugs, Linens, Theatrical Costume, Mascot Cleaning. Also does Starched Detachable Collars!

Barker Laundry Service (UK. The folks who did Downton Abbey’s Collars.)

Live Journal posts on Starching

Fedora Lounge: Instructions for Home Starching

Some Books For Studying The Detachable Collar Industry History in the USA

I’ve been working on assigning dates to Detachable Starched Collars I own with information I’ve found through advertisements in Newspapers.com , Patent Records, clipped ads for sale on eBay, etc but was looking for more. Now I have run into some online copyright expired books and magazines that I think may help with doing this also. Many later collars have a lot of information about brand names, place of origin and manufacturing company names printed on the inside that help with this, and these books seem like they may be useful for narrowing down dates on collars by tracking the history of the name changes in the companies. Collar companies in the US were constantly eating one another, combining, breaking apart and vanishing through the whole second half of the 19th Century and first half of the 20th Century. Cluett for example went through all sorts of changes that may help date their collars. Some parts of these books seem to track a few of the dates of these mutations. If there is someone with better obsessive compulsive genes for working on forming this into cheat sheets and databases of collar names and dates faster, feel free to try. Meanwhile, if you are looking to “date” your own collars this is a good place to start.

HathiTrust – The City of Troy and its Vicinity 1876 Arthur James Weise

The Clothier and Furnisher at HathiTrust Magazine Volumes from 1882-1926

Troy’s one hundred years, 1789-1889 Arthur James Weise

The Clothier’s and Haberdasher’s Weekly at HathiTrust
Magazine volumes from 1892-1901

The Clothier and Furnisher 1896 [Magazine] Geo. N. Lowrey Co.

The Clothier and Furnisher 1904 [Magazine] Geo. N Lowrey Co.

Men’s Wear at HathiTrust Magazine volumes 1905-1909

Men’s Wear 1907 [Magazine] Fairchild Co.

Fairchild’s Men’s Wear Directory 1907 [New York]

Men’s Wear 1909 [Magazine] Fairchild Co.

Men’s Wear 1910 [Magazine] Fairchild Co.

The Clothier and Furnisher 1910 [Magazine] Geo. N Lowrey Co.

The Shirt and Collar Industries 1916 Dept of Commerce US Govt Printing Office

The Haberdasher 1921 [Magazine] The Haberdasher Co.

The Haberdasher 1922 [Magazine] The Haberdasher Co.

Hand Drawn Collar patterns of Early 20th Century Detachable Collars Pt6: a Feminine Style Woman’s Embroidered Collar

I have two sizes of this collar, and the drawing tries to show the two sizes at right (though it rather confuses the button hole placement. This collar would be worn over a high necked dress but likely does not button to it. The embroidery goes at front. Again, the collar is made of thinner material then men’s collars.
One of the collars as scanned now.
The reverse of the collar.

Hand Drawn Collar patterns of Early 20th Century Detachable Collars Pt5: two Masculine cut Women’s Embroidered Collars

Here are yet more drawings I made c. 1980 of my beginning collar collection. These are women’s collars that evoke the shapes of men’s Early 20th Century collars but have embroidery on them to make them less masculine looking.

The first vintage celluloid-covered collar box I ever purchased with some of the women’s collars I had collected by the early 1980s.
Ladies Floral Embroidered Collar, with a lock front. The fabric is lighter than is standard for a man’s collar, with no internal stiffening in between the layers of the band. The collar section is a single layer of thin material with an embroidered edge. All is starched to a rigidity that allows it to appear to be made of heavy stiff paper.
When closed, it makes a near tube shape.
Note the extra fabric at left. This “lock front” cut allows the tube to stay rigid at front with a single stud, preventing a pinch at the neck.
Ladies Embroidered Dot Collar with a lock front, very similar to the above but with two layers on the collar part. The dots are satin stitched.

Hand Drawn Collar patterns of Early 20th Century Detachable Collars Pt4: Three Soft Collars for Men

More of my drawings made c.1980.

Cluett, Peabody & Co. Inc., Aratex, “Lane”
Cluett, Peabody & Co. Inc., Aratex, “Lane”
Cluett, Peabody & Co. Inc., Aratex, “Lane”
Cluett, Peabody & Co. Inc., Aratex, “Lane”
Cluett, Peabody & Co. Inc., Aratex, “Lane”
No Name Soft Collar
No Name Soft Collar
No Name Soft Collar
Arrow Cluett Peabody & Co. Inc, “Pell” Roll-Front, Light Weight Collar
Arrow Cluett Peabody & Co. Inc, “Pell” Roll-Front, Light Weight Collar
Arrow Cluett Peabody & Co. Inc, “Pell” Roll-Front, Light Weight Collar

Hand Drawn Collar patterns of Early 20th Century Detachable Collars Pt3: Two Wing Collars, the “Lido” & “Host”

More collars from my early collection drawn c.1980

Arrow-De Luxe “Lido”, a wing collar with an unusual front notch.
Earle & Wilson “Host” wing collar, one of the most common wing collars to find.

Hand Drawn Collar patterns of Early 20th Century Detachable Collars Pt2: Triangle “Plaza” Club Collar with Lock front

So, continuing with the drawings I made back c.1978-80 of my collar collection, here is another example.

Photo of another club collar, the Triangle "Plaza" Collar.
Another club collar, the Triangle “Plaza” Collar.
Triangle “Plaza” Lock Front Club Collar
Spread the images so that the front buttonholes are 1/4″ more than your neck measurement then connect the lines and move the back button hole equidistant from the two front ones. Add seam allowances and sew together normally.

Hand Drawn Collar patterns of Early 20th Century Detachable Collars Pt1: Four Wing Collars and a club Collar, the Ashbourne-2

One of the things that has weirdly defined my life is that pretty much since I went to college and first got serious about costuming I have been working on writing a costume book. It never gets finished, but I make lots of components for it. In the 1990s this morphed into The Costumers Manifesto web site, but back around the late 1970s and early 1980s it was just a few random things that interested me. Detachable hard collars have always had a fascination for me and so in those pre-Internet and pre-home printer/scanner/copier days I set out to make life size drawings to be used as patterns of my then small collar collection (back when it still fit in a single large cookie tin) in imitation of my hero Janet Arnold. These were laboriously hand drawn with a Rapidograph, a high maintenance technical pen that is the ancestor of my now favorite Signo Uniball pens.

My collar collection c. 1983
Diagram of the ends of 4 types of early 20th Century wing collars, suitable for using to make patterns.
Ashbourne-2 Collar
Ashbourne-2 Collar Drawing

The idea with all these is that since both sides of the collar are identical, you can use them to form a pattern that you can lengthen to the needed size so long as you have the basic shape. In all cases seam allowance must be added!

DRAMA-112 Stage Makeup Spring 2019 Course Syllabus

 DRAMA-112 Stage Makeup Spring 2019

Section Number: 1332

Canvas Site: https://dvc.instructure.com/courses/37608 

Instructor: Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Cell phone: 415 272 5157, email: thecostumersmanifesto@yahoo.com  or Tara@costumes.org or tmaginnis520@dvc.edu. My design portfolio is at http://taramaginnis.com  On Facebook I am “Tara Maginnis” and you may friend me if that amuses you.

Class Photo Pagehttps://taramaginnisclasses.shutterfly.com Photos that I take of you in class will be posted there, where you can download or print out the images.  I copy-left my photos so you may use them any way you wish, however, for this reason let me know if you do NOT want photos of you or your work put online. I will still take photos of you for grading, but I will not post them if you do not want your images set free in the world in this way.

Hashtag: You may wish to tag any photos or video you take in class with #DVCMakeupClass to help your fellow-students to find them online. 

Class Time & Place: Tuesday & Thursday 9:35 am-11:00 am in the PAC-3 (Makeup Room & Men’s Dressing Room). 

Drama Department website: (For play schedule dates and tickets) http://dvcdrama.net

Office Hours:  Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:30-2:00pm in PA121 (Cubicle off of Green Room with giant wooden scissors) You can also find me during most of the time between 11-1pm and 2-7 on Tuesdays and Thursdays 1-5 Fridays in the Costume Studio in PA1 or The Trap Room (Costume Storage) PA6, or the Makeup Room PA3. (wander around and look for me and/or phone my cell # listed above.) 

Catalog Course Description: DRAMA-112 Stage Makeup Department: Performing Arts   Division:  Applied and Fine Arts   Units:  3.00   Grade Code: Student choice Repeatability: 0   Number of Hours Per Semester Lecture: 54.00 Laboratory: 0.00 Activity: 0.00 This course studies the aesthetics, materials, and procedures of stage makeup involving: corrective and aging techniques, latex and derma wax for witches and fairies, character makeup for a variety of historical periods and genres, the creation of animals and monsters, and the construction of beards and mustaches.  

Instructional methods: Because this class is usually larger than the makeup classroom can fit, the class will be divided into two groups staggered to rotate in the class space for much of the semester.  Students in each group will begin by viewing a video demo in the men’s dressing room next door, where my virtual self will show you how to do a style of theatrical makeup.  At the next class meeting you will spend time in the makeup room working on your own face (or that of a volunteer you bring to class) and getting help from the real “live” me in how to do the assigned makeup.  Other classes are done in a single large group where indicated in the calendar.

If You Miss an Assignment: What To Do: If you miss a day in class, or have a planned event (going to KCACTF, your cousin’s wedding, etc.) that will make you miss a future event, go on to Canvas to the weekly Module for the lost time and watch the how to videos asap.  You can do the project at DVC when I (Tara) am here and I’ll take photos of you, or you may do the project at home.  If you do the latter, please watch the short video on Canvas, taking your own photos to help you get the best pictures possible.

Videos: If you miss a video demo, please hasten to see it before you get behind. You may come into the costume studio during Tara’s hours listed above and ask to watch the disk in one of the dressing rooms, or you can download a lesson or lessons at home online at the provided links on Canvas, or you can also purchase DVD copies of the Theatrical Makeup Design Interactive video demonstrations we show in class at http://TheatricalDesign.com

Tickets to DVC shows: Either viewing or taking part in the two shows of the current semester are requirements, you can purchase tickets for these shows through the bookstore, box office, or ideally, sign up on the volunteer board in the Greenroom and serve as ushers to a performance to see it for free.

Book: A Guide for Makeup by Robin and Stuart Carlson, 1982 available as a free PDF at https://archive.org/details/guideformakeup00cars  depending on your learning needs I can also assign, loan and/or recommend alternate books to help you with study in special areas, or for better academic understanding. If you have a special need for word-based learning, step by step photo how-to info, or are mainly interested in sfx makeup or body painting, chances are I have a book that will help you.

Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes
DRAMA-112: Stage Makeup A. Describe the steps used in makeup for a variety of characters, types, ages, and historical periods. B. Demonstrate proficiency in make-up application. C. Identify the various types of makeup commonly used in theater and demonstrate techniques to apply stage makeup materials. D. Analyze a visual characterization through makeup design. E. Create a makeup design for a specific production.
      DRAMA-112 Stage Makeup Minimum Required Materials:                  Full-size deluxe crème (oil-based) student theatrical make-up kit. Every major theatrical makeup company makes excellent deluxe student makeup kits. They cost $60-90. If you already have bought a full-size student theatrical makeup kit like the ones required, feel free to use it, the choice of brand is immaterial to this class, though Ben Nye is my personal favorite.   Kits like these are available at the DVC Bookstore by request at the counter, in person at Encore Theatrical Supply in Pleasanton or at Kryolan in San Francisco, or ordered online from many suppliers including Ben Nye, Mehron, Graftobian, & Kryolan
•  https://www.stagemakeuponline.com
•  https://www.mehron.com
•  https://us.kryolan.com 
Label all the parts of your kit with your name or initials. Note: If you are allergic or hyper sensitive to oil-based makeup you may substitute a water-based kit like Mehron All-Pro Starblend Theatrical Makeup Kit, or Ben Nye Theatrical Cake Makeup Kit. However, these kits are more difficult to use, and sometimes more expensive, so do not do this on a mere whim.   4 or more flat nylon/takelon angled or straight “shader” brushes about 1/4”–1/2” wide, labeled with your name, for having a brush for each color you use. Note: You can usually get this type of brush in a package with other inexpensive brushes at big art and/ or crafts stores like Michaels or Jo-Ann.  By going to their web site coupon pages before you go to the store
: •      http://www.michaels.com/coupon
•      http://www.joann.com/coupon
you can usually get either a 40% or 50% off coupon that will make such a packet of brushes very inexpensive.  Michaels.com also sells a good (no discount) $5 bag of suitable brushes both in store and online at http://www.michaels.com 
  2 or more packages of makeup remover towelettes labeled with your name for getting makeup off your face. You can get this at any Dollar store unless you have special skin needs. Keep them fresh by “burping” and resealing them each time you remove a towel. Huggies Baby wipes are also OK. A jar of cold cream labeled with your name for brush cleaning. $ store.   2 or more wash cloths or ripped up towel pieces labeled with your name for brush cleaning. White ones’ work best.   A portable mirror for doing makeup in impromptu locations, labeled with your name. A $ store is your friend again: it is easy to make one by transposing an easel back from a picture frame to a same sized framed mirror.   A small container to hold water, like a recycled yogurt cup, can or folding cup, labeled with your name. Pull something out of a recycle bin.   A binder to hold your makeup renderings, your research images, and photos of your work for the Morgue/Portfolio project.    A container like a tool box, large cosmetic bag, Zip-lockor even a cardboard shoe box, labeled with your name.   (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.   (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.   Pencil sharpener & colored pencils (or crayons) for doing your makeup renderings.     Small scissors for cutting crepe hair.  A big safety pin for slicing cuts in scar wax. Dental floss for removing nose and scar wax.   You can, and likely should, plump up your kits with any interesting and/or cheap Halloween or street makeup you already have, or find cheaply during the semester.  Fall is an especially good season for picking up neat stuff like this at Hot Topic, CVS, Claire’s, Icing, etc. and at big box retail stores and “Dollar” stores in the “seasonal” departments in October.  Spring is less so, but not empty of opportunity.  

Disability Statements: “Students who require alternative formats for course materials or adaptive equipment because of a specific disability can request them through the Disability Support Services office. The High Tech Center in LC-­‐107 is an adaptive technology computer lab available for students with disabilities and is open Monday-­Thursday from 9am-­‐5pm, and Fridays from 9am-­‐1pm. Please contact Carrie Million in LC 112 or at 925‐685-1230 ext. 2553 for more information”.  (You can also ask me for any sort of help or materials you need if you have a learning difficulty that I can possibly fix for your needs.  For example, if you have a need for a quiet space for sensory overload or anxiety, you can go to the “Welcome to Vienna” storage room in the back of the PA1 costume studio & close the door and/or turn off lights. -Tara).

Students who wear Glasses:  Some students who wear glasses (other than reading glasses) find the mirrors in our makeup room are inadequate for clear vision without glasses.  Other students also sometimes find this to be true.  If you wear glasses, and are having trouble with our mirrors, you can try my standing magnifying mirror with built in light and/or my two pairs of “makeup glasses” to help you, before deciding which of these types of vision aid to buy at your local drugstore for home use.

Students with Beards and/or skin problems:  If at any time, for any reason, you want to avoid doing the assigned makeup on your own face, you may bring in a volunteer whom you have recruited for the purpose.  Some students have elected to do this for a full semester with one volunteer, or intermittently with several.  If you already have a beard you will need to plan on finding a volunteer on which to apply a beard for your group’s Beard Makeup Day, or apply crepe hair to another part of your face or body to do the project.

Grading: Grading is based on a system of points given for successful completion of assignments.

Evaluation: Project assignments will be graded based on Completion (Is the project really done, or have important steps been left unfinished?  Did you make an honest effort to do the assignment as described, or have you ignored the criteria?)

Definitions:

  • Rendering- drawing of a design which one intends to execute.
  • Makeup rendering- drawing of a makeup design one intends to execute
  • Morgue- an organized file of clippings
  • Makeup Morgue– an organized collection of clippings, pictures and old renderings to aid in inspiration for makeup design.
  • Portfolio– An organized picture-book of your work in a visual medium
  • Makeup Portfolio– An organized picture-book of your work in Makeup.

Combined Makeup Morgue/Portfolio Project: Throughout the semester, gather images from magazines, books and/or online that you find inspiring or useful for research, on the makeup research topics we cover.  Save them in your binder along with your makeup renderings and photos of your completed projects and the binder may be turned in for 30 pts of credit during the final exam period.  You will get the binder back as soon as it is graded, the very same day.  You may also do this project in alternate electronic forms such as web page portfolios, Pinterest boards, PowerPoint presentations or organized file folders that I can view.

Student Code of Conduct: Learn your new Mantra: 

“There is nothing wrong with my face.”

While a makeup class is an appropriate place to discuss age, race, disease, genetics, smoking, drinking, gender, acne, tattoos, body issues and lots of other hot button topics as they relate to the human face, that is not a license to give anyone a hard time about any of these issues.  Please treat this class as a supportive therapy group that can help you learn to accept, and revel in, your face.  Help your classmates do the same.

Assignment calendar:

Week 1:

TuesdayJanuary 29: Pick up Syllabus. Explanations about makeup kits, making a list of needed color kits for bookstore & taking class “mugshot” photos. Homework: Make funny faces in the mirror, today and every day thereafter.

Thursday January 31:  Watch the Short Makeup Videos in the Make-up room and Men’s Dressing Room. then do Practice Drawing Makeup Renderings on Face Outline Sheets

Week 2:

Tuesday February 5: Group 1: View Your Self Only More So and “Corrective” Videos in the Men’s Dressing Room. Group 2: Watch The Human Face Part 1 and do the quiz on Canvas online

Thursday February 7: Group 1: Bring in evidence of research on “Corrective” makeup.  “Corrective” Makeup, completed in class. Group 2: View Your Self Only More So and “Corrective” Videos in the Men’s Dressing Room.

Week 3:

Tuesday February 12: Group 1: View Aged Self video, Group 2: Bring in evidence of research on “Corrective” makeup.  “Corrective” Makeup, completed in class.

Thursday February 14:Group 1: Aged Self Makeup, completed in class. Bring in evidence of research on Real Aged Faces.   Group 2: View Aged Self Video If possible, bring in photos of parents/grandparents or other older relatives next class.

Week 4: SPECIAL NOTE KCACTF ATTENDEES SPEAK TO TARA ABOUT YOUR OPTIONS FOR MAKING UP ASSIGNMENTS FOR THIS WEEK!

Tuesday February 19:  Group 1: View Happy Aged Character Video. Group 2: Aged Self Makeup, completed in class. Bring in evidence of research on Real Aged Faces.

Thursday February 21: Group 1: Happy Aged Character makeup rendering due at beginning of class. Happy Aged Character Makeup, completed in class.  Group 2: View Happy Aged Character Video.

Week 5:

Tuesday February 26:Group 1: Watch Angry Aged Character Video. Group 2: Happy Aged Character makeup rendering due at beginning of class. Happy Aged Character Makeup, completed in class.

Thursday February 28:Group 1: Angry Aged Character makeup rendering due at beginning of class.  Angry Aged Character Makeup, completed in class.  Group 2: View Angry Aged Character Video.

Week 6:

Tuesday March 5:Group 1: Watch Cuts & Bruises Videos Group 2: Angry Aged Character makeup rendering due at beginning of class.  Angry Aged Character Makeup, completed in class.

Thursday March 7:Group 1: Bring in evidence of research on cuts, bruises and injuries. Do freeform Cuts & Bruises Makeup, (no rendering required). Group 2: Watch Cuts & Bruises Videos.

Week 7: TECH WEEK FOR PETER AND THE STARCATCHER

Tuesday March 12:Group 1: Watch Wax nose video. Group 2: Bring in evidence of research on cuts, bruises and injuries. Do freeform Cuts & Bruises Makeup, (no rendering required).

Thursday March 14: Group 1: Wax Nose Makeup rendering, Makeup using wax nose or forehead, completed in class. Group 2: Watch Nose Wax Video

Week 8:

Tuesday March 19: Group 1: Watch Gothic Horror Video. Group 2: Wax Nose Makeup rendering. Makeup using wax nose or forehead, completed in class.

Thursday March 21: Group 1: Bring in evidence of research on Gothic, Horror Movie, or Silent film makeup. Do Gothic Horror Makeup and Gothic Horror Rendering. Group 2: Watch Gothic Horror Video.

Week 9:

Tuesday March 26: Group 1: View Beard Video. Group 2: Bring in evidence of research on Gothic, Horror Movie, or Silent film makeup. Do Gothic Horror Makeup, and Gothic Horror Rendering.

Explanation: Famous Guys in Beards. Do a makeup design based on a well-known image of a guy in a beard/moustache. The best folks to pick are historical and newsworthy ones where you can get lots of images like Lenin, Darwin, Charles I, Frederick Douglas, Emperor Meiji, Dickens, Che Guevara, King Faisal, Osama Bin Laden, etc. or the Unabomber, members of ZZ Top, Steve Jobs & Steve Wozniak.

Thursday March 28:  Group 1: Bring in multiple images of a famous guy with beard/moustache.  Beard Makeup Rendering, Makeup using a crepe hair beard replicating the aforementioned bearded guy. Group 2: View The Human Face Part 2 and do the quiz on Canvas online

SPRING BREAK: APRIL 1-7 No Classes!

Week 10:

Tuesday April 9:Group 1: View The Human Face Part 1 and do the quiz on Canvas online. Group 2: View Beard Video.

Thursday April 11:Group 1: View Kabuki Video Group 2: Bring in multiple images of a famous guy with beard/moustache.  Beard Makeup Rendering, Makeup using a crepe hair beard replicating the aforementioned bearded guy.

Week 11:

Tuesday April 16: Group 1: “Kabuki” Makeup: Bring in evidence of research on mask/makeup source material. and a makeup rendering  Kabuki or Chinese opera or Alaskan/African/Asian Mask makeup completed in class. Group 2: View Kabuki Video

Explanation: Kabuki/Chinese Opera/ Native Mask: find a non-naturalistic face design from a non-western theatrical tradition, including, but not limited to Alaska Native masks, African ritual makeup, Balinese dance drama, Chinese Opera, Maori Tattoos, Kabuki Kumidori, etc.  Make copies of your source material.  Draw a makeup rendering that adapts the design to fit you or your model’s face using primarily 2-D makeup without extensive prosthetics. 

Thursday April 18:Group 1: Watch Drag Video. Group 2: “Kabuki” Makeup: Bring in evidence of research on mask/makeup source material, and a makeup rendering, and Kabuki or Chinese opera or Alaskan/African/Asian Mask makeup completed in class.

Week 12:

Tuesday April 23:.Group 1: Bring in evidence of research on Drag and/or Glamour makeup source material. Rendering of Drag Makeup due at beginning of class, Drag makeup completed in class. Group 2: Watch Drag Video.

Thursday April 25: Group 1: Watch Animal Video.  Group 2: Bring in evidence of research on Drag and/or Glamour makeup source material. Rendering of Drag Makeup due at beginning of class, Drag makeup completed in class.

Week 13: TECH WEEK FOR OUR LADY OF 121st STREET

Tuesday April 30: Group 1: Bring in evidence of research on your chosen animal and any makeup examples or interpretations of it you may wish to inspire you. Animal makeup rendering due at beginning of class, Animal makeup completed in class. Group 2:  Watch Animal video.

Explanation: Animal: Research a real animal face (no Hello Kitty or Happy Bunny or super simple cartoon critters). Gather together source material and print it out.  Adapt the animal face into a stylized makeup design for your face.  Do the makeup.

Thursday May 2: Group 1: View The Human Face Pt. 2 and do the quiz on Canvas online. Group 2: Bring in evidence of research on your chosen animal and any makeup examples or interpretations of it you may wish to inspire you. Animal makeup rendering due at beginning of class, Animal makeup completed in class.

Week 14:

Tuesday May 7:  Both Groups: Meet in the Commons (good weather) or Cafeteria (bad weather) with your kits for Outdoor Face Painting Day 1: Zombie Walk Theme

Explanation: Commons/Cafeteria Face Painting Days. Bring your kit and gather all the things you may need but won’t have when you leave our makeup room and get a gig doing makeup, and set up in an unfamiliar, unsuitable location, and do makeup on each other and strangers in this awkward public place. Surprisingly fun.

Thursday May 9:Both Groups: Meet in the Commons (good weather) or Cafeteria (bad weather) with your kits for Free Face Painting Day 2: Face Stencil Theme & Home-made stencil project

Week 15:

Tuesday May 14: Group 1: Mythical Creature Fantasy Final makeup rendering due at beginning of class, Mythical Creature Fantasy Final makeup completed in class. (see more on Final Project on following pages). Group 2: Watch The Human Face Part 3 and do the quiz on Canvas online

Thursday May 16:  Group 1: Watch The Human Face Part 3 and do the quiz on Canvas online.  Group 2: Mythical Creature Fantasy Final makeup rendering due at beginning of class. Mythical Creature Fantasy Final makeup completed in class. (see more on Final Project on following pages).

Week 16:

Tuesday May 21: Group 1: Come to the Greenroom upstairs and bring your Makeup Morgue/Makeup Portfolio project. Check through your assignments with Tara (parked in her office at PA 121 off of the Green Room) and learn your grade. Turn in any missing work. Also bring any late projects, photos of projects you did at home, and your double checked grade points sheet to make sure I have your correct amount of points.  If you are not sure what you have, please come and we can usually find a way for you to get projects done by the end of the day sufficient to pass the class. I will be staying after the final class period till 5pm to help you to get your work done. Group 2: Watch The Human Face Pt 4 downstairs and do the quiz on Canvas online

Thursday May 23: Final Class. Group 1: Watch The Human Face Pt 4 downstairs and do the quiz on Canvas online. Group 2: Come to the Greenroom upstairs and bring your Makeup Morgue/Makeup Portfolio project. Check through your assignments with Tara (parked in her office at PA 121 off of the Green Room) and learn your grade. Turn in any missing work. Also bring any late projects, photos of projects you did at home, and your double checked grade points sheet to make sure I have your correct amount of points.  If you are not sure what you have, please come and we can usually find a way for you to get projects done by the end of the day sufficient to pass the class. I will be staying after the final class period till 5pm to help you to get your work done.

Mythical Creature Makeup Final Project:

Create a makeup for a God, a Fairy, a Mythical Beast or Alien, that combines elements from the natural world (characteristics of animals, plants or minerals) and humanoid appearance.  The skin should have a color, texture or pattern that is not normally human.  You may use store-bought or home-made prosthetics or stencils if you wish.  Some examples you may wish to think about:

Rawhead and Bloody Bones, blood running down face, skinless (?) With bones poking out. Shaves or scalps bad children as they sleep, eats runaway children.

Jenny Greenteeth, river-hag or lake monster, green skin, long seaweed hair, sharp green teeth, turns into pond and duckweed to drown people.

The Ao Ao, a cursed hybrid of man and sheep with fangs, devours mountain travelers.

The Lorelei, a beautiful but deadly mermaid who lures sailors to steer their boats onto the rocks to drown and be devoured.

Black Annis, cave dwelling, blue-faced one eyed crone with iron claws.  Eats children and lambs, wears a skirt of their skins, can transform into a cat, an Ancient goddess of child sacrifice.

Nellie Longarms, a water hag who drowns children, and snatches children up after their bedtime.

Werewolves, unfortunate humans who turn into wolves at full moon.

Quetzalcoatl one of the manifestations of the Aztec sun god Tezcatlipoca and represented as a man and/or plumed serpent.

Dragons, both good and bad, are fire breathing reptiles, some with the ability to fly or transform into human shapes. In Asia, they are a symbol of virtue and power, in Christian Europe a symbol of the devil.

Tsukumogami are Japanese objects of ordinary household use, that have acquired a living soul after 100 years of faithful service to man.  Usually harmless spirits, they may act up or play tricks on their owners if they feel neglected, ill-treated or rejected because they have broken.  These include Morinji-no-okama (a possessed tea-kettle), Zorigami (a possessed clock), Kyorinrin (possessed papers or scrolls) and others.

Gargoyles Architectural representations of imaginary monsters in stone.

Klingons Warrior-cultured aliens from Star Trek.

The Phoenix A beautiful bird spirit found in many cultures.  Associated with female characteristics in Japan where they are often included in bridal dress patterns, in China they are the symbol of the Empresses of old, in Russia, it is the Firebird, associated with the Fire Flower, a symbol of female and natural reproductive power, and in Western tradition, it is symbolic of rebirth after disaster, especially fire, which is why it is the symbol of San Francisco, depicted on the City’s flag.

Goblins In Oz, underground mining creatures made of stone, fearful of eggs, in Harry Potter, small magical bankers and silversmiths who resent their 2nd class treatment by wizards.

The Green Man Pre-Christian British god of the forest, frequently depicted as part tree, especially oak. 

An Alicanto, is a mythic Chilean night-flying bird that feeds on gold, silver, and jewels, and has the sparkling iridescent feathers and eyes to show for it. If a miner follows an alicanto without being caught, he may find silver or gold; however, if the alicanto discovers him, the bird will guide him off a cliff, and he will fall to his death.

Raven/Coyote Native American trickster spirits with superpowers that include an ability to appear human. However, their greatest powers are an ability to fool the wicked, and seduce the beautiful.

The Tin Woodsman, Tic-Tock the Clockwork Man, and other mechanical and or metal men from Oz and elsewhere.

Coppelia, an attractive 18th Century girl automaton doll (or a real girl pretending to be one).

A Kitsune-tsuki is a Japanese fox spirit, usually a represented as beautiful woman with fox like features (into which foxes were supposed to be able to transform), or a real woman, possessed by a fox.

Plataea an ugly, but lovesick, swamp nymph.  Sweet but plain, often played by a man in drag, she must be funny, but touching, ugly, yet appealing, and visually connected to her role as a swamp dwelling aquatic nymph. She thinks she is fabulously beautiful.

Villja, a supernaturally beautiful Middle-European forest nymph with long hair and the ability to drive men mad with unobtainable desire.

The Green Lady, a British ghost or woodland spirit similar to a Villja in that her beauty has a hypnotic effect on men, but she also sometimes drains them of life like a soul-draining vampire.

Hombre Gato, an Argentinian Cat-Man, similar to a werewolf, in that he transforms from human into Cat-Man at night, and preys on those traveling the streets after dark.

Yuki-onna the snow ghost of Japan takes the form of a beautiful girl as white and blue as the ice and snow she dwells in, she may kill a traveler by a kiss, freezing him instantly.

Snegourichka the Russian “Snow-Girl” of 19th Century folktales was similar in melting properties to the American Frosty the Snowman, an immortal snow maiden, who melts near fire, or when love fills her heart, or instead becomes human and mortal because of love.  In the Soviet era, she was transformed into the perky and plucky Granddaughter of Ded Morotz (Father Frost), the tall, thin, doddering Santa-Claus type figure associated with the New Year.

The Mishibizhiw, the Under Water Lynx/Great Water Panther of the Great Lakes region, is the king of all North American lake monsters with a body like a Lynx with fish scales on it’s back, a face like a man with a fur mane, glowing red eyes, horns, and a long spiky tail like a dragon with a fish tail end.  Their roar sounds like water, and copper comes from them, if angered they cause storms that can kill travelers.

The Impundulu or “Lightning Bird” of Africa is a huge black and white bird demon-vampire, that can transform to a handsome young man and call down lightning.

DRAMA-112 Stage Makeup—Fall 2018   Assignments Points Possible Points you have Practice Makeup Renderings 10   Demonstration of email forward 10   Online Quizes on The Human Face Parts 1-4 20   “Corrective” makeup research 10   “Corrective” Makeup, completed in class. 15   Real Aged Faces Research 10   Aged Self Makeup, completed in class. 15   Happy Aged Character makeup rendering 10   Happy Aged Character Makeup, completed in class. 15   Angry Aged Character makeup rendering 10   Angry Aged Character Makeup, completed in class. 15   Research on Cuts, Bruises and other injuries 10   Cuts and Bruises makeup. 15   Makeup using wax nose, completed in class. 20   Color Rendering for nose makeup 10   Research on Gothic, Horror film, or Silent film makeup 10   Gothic Horror Rendering 10   Gothic Horror makeup. 15   Multiple Research images of your famous guy with beard. 10   Beard makeup rendering 10   Makeup using a crepe hair beard 20   Participation in Free Face Painting Day 1: Zombie Horror Theme 10   Participation in Free Face Painting Day 2: Face Stencil  Theme 10   Face Stencil 15   Research on your Non-Western makeup/mask sources 10   Non Western Makeup rendering 10   Non Western Makeup 20   Research on Drag and/or Glamour Makeup 10   Rendering of Drag Makeup due at beginning of class. 10   Drag Makeup completed in class. 20   Research on chosen Animal and related makeup 10   Animal makeup rendering due at beginning of class. 15   Animal makeup completed in class. 20   Completed, labeled Makeup Morgue of your research &  renderings 30   Rendering of final Mythical Makeup project. 15   Execution of final Mythical Makeup project. 25   Extra credit projects by arrangement to replace missing classes and/or assignments. Examples can include: Making up kids, friends and self at home, Using mesh, stencils and spray makeup to decorate skin, cleaning, organizing, photographing or scanning some part of the Makeup Studio, or the Makeup History Collection, replicate or adapt a makeup from one of Tara’s magazines or books, designing makeup for a student production or class project, replicate a makeup or hairstyle from one of Tara’s makeup history books, or serving on the makeup and costume crew of a show.                          TBA     Total points possible within normal class assignments 500  
When checking the Canvas Course assignment grading page, check at the far right for your percentages to tell how your grade is doing as you go along. ·         500-450 pts (100-90%) = A ·         449-400 pts (89-80%) = B ·         399-350 pts (79-70%) = C ·         349-300 pts (69-60%) = D ·         299-0 pts 59-0% = F

Costume Design